How to Write a Letter to Inquire About a House for Sale

If you see a house for sale that you would like more information about, sending a letter of inquiry can lead the homeowner or the Realtor to reply with a letter instead of a phone call. Having information about the houses that interest you--in a letter or a brochure--allows you to compare different properties if you send inquiry letters about more than one house. Written replies are also useful if you and your spouse cannot speak with the owner or Realtor at the same time.

Step 1

Obtain the physical and mailing address for the house. Look for a realty sign to see if a Realtor is handling the sale and address the letter to the Realtor if applicable. Write down the street address of the house if it has a mailbox and the owner is selling it without representation.

Step 2

Address the letter to the Realtor or homeowner. Perform a reverse search on the address to obtain the homeowner's name if you are not sending the letter to a Realtor. Addressing the owner by name helps prevent the reader from thinking that the letter is junk mail.

Step 3

Ask for the details about the house. Write a brief introductory paragraph explaining how you came to know that the house is available for sale and include a bullet list of questions. For example, ask about the size, age and cost of the home. In addition, you can request pictures of the interior and exterior of the house.

Step 4

Close your letter with "Thank you" or "Sincerely" and sign and print your name.

Step 5

Include a stamped, self-addressed envelope in your mailing. You are more apt to receive a reply if you make replying easy for the reader. If you request pictures of the house, make sure that the envelope you include is large enough to hold photos.

Tip

Include your contact information. While you might prefer to receive a letter in reply, including your phone number can increase the chances of hearing from the seller.

Warning

Do not make an offer for the house in your inquiry letter. This letter is to discover information about the house, not to make an offer to buy the house.

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