Forensic Neuropsychologist Salary

Forensic neuropsychology testimony is widely accepted by the courts.

Forensic neuropsychology is a relatively new field of study. Forensic neuropsychologists work closely with police detectives and lawyers to help catch criminals and evaluate suspects or clients, examining their state of mind related to the crime they are accused of. Forensic neuropsychologists are sometimes also involved in helping evaluate juries and analyzing witness testimony for trials.

Salary

Salary data for forensic neuropsychology specifically, is not widely available. According to the latest data from U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics, the median annual salary for psychologists was $64,140 in 2008. However, according to AsiaWeek.com, salaries earned by forensic neuropsychologists is $100,000 per year and more. The amount likely depends on how many forensic neuropsychology jobs a psychologist receives as well as other factors, such as negotiation and reputation.

Education

According to Sciencedirect.com, there is no formal education or certification related directly to the field of forensic neuropsychology that goes beyond the requirements of others working in the field of psychology. Most psychologists have a doctorate, which requires four years of undergraduate study and five years of graduate study at an accredited university.

Licensing

Psychologists are licensed by the medical board in the state in which they practice. Licensing requirements for each state may differ, but all states require certification in order to practice in their state. In most cases, you will need to have a doctorate in psychology and a minimum of one to two years professional experience in the field of psychology before you will be allowed to take a certification examination.

Study Findings

According to Sciencedirect.com, a large number of work-related studies have been performed on the field of forensic neuropsychology starting in 1990. Studies have found that neuropsychologists gained most of their work through law enforcement and lawyer referrals. Moreover, because this is a growing field that typically pays higher fees that psychologists in other professions earn, many psychologists spend at least part of their time working as forensic neuropsychology consultants.

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