How to Buy Gold Bullion From the Government

Gold bullion is a great investment and store of value.

Many financial advisors recommended the purchase of gold in 2010, and investors searched for new ways to buy or sell it. Bullion gold is the purest form of the precious metal, and usually comes in bar, ingot or coin form. Private buyers and sellers abound for those who wish to take advantage of the current "gold rush." The U.S. Mint also offers coins in various denominations.

Buy from the U.S. Mint

Step 1

Navigate to the U.S. Mint online catalogue, at usmint.gov. See Resources.

Step 2

Create a customer account for greater ease in tracking your order.

Step 3

Select one of the precious metal coins available, including the First Spouse, American Buffalo 24K or American Eagle. As of November 2010, the American Buffalo 24K One-Ounce sells for $1,660; the American Eagle Four Coin Proof Set, containing 1.85 ounces of gold, sells for $3,030; and the First Spouse coins, containing one-half ounce of gold, sell for $841 for the uncirculated coin and $854 for the proof.

Step 4

Add your desired products to your cart and proceed to checkout.

Buy from an Authorized Purchaser

Step 1

Navigate to the U.S. Mint Authorized Purchaser website, at usmint.gov. See Resources.

Step 2

Locate a reseller. The database of authorized purchasers is organized by state and lists national resellers.

Step 3

Select an authorized purchaser and buy from the extended line of U.S. Mint precious metal coins. In November 2010, the price of gold was near $1350 per troy ounce.

Step 4

Compare private prices to U.S. Mint website prices, but remember that most coin dealers charge a premium to sell a minted coin.

Tip

The benefit of buying coins from the U.S. Mint is that the weight and content of the coins is known. The U.S. Mint does charge a premium for their coins to cover the cost of minting and marketing. Paying a premium for precious metals is not uncommon, as most gold or precious metal sellers charge a premium to buy physical metals. In most cases the value of a minted coin is no greater than the value of the precious metals it contains.

Warning

Bullion in unminted form is unavailable through the U.S. government.

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