How to Apply for Welfare Benefits in Kentucky

Some people in Kentucky rely on welfare benefits like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, the Kentucky Transitional Assistance Program and Medicaid to help support themselves and their families. Eligibility criteria differ from program to program and you may qualify for only one program or you may qualify for several different ones. You may qualify for some programs, like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, even if you are employed if you have low income.

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Medicaid pays for medical care for some Kentucky residents.

Apply for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, commonly referred to as food stamps, at the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services office in the county in which you reside. Fill out the application completely and accurately. Staff will assist you if you need help filling out the application. If you prefer, you can download an application online, complete it and mail it, fax it or deliver it by hand to the office.

Apply for the Kentucky Transitional Assistance Program, or K-TAP, which provides temporary financial assistance to families in need at the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services office in the county in which you reside. Fill out the application completely and accurately. Staff will assist you if you need help filling out the application.

Apply for Medicaid at the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services office in the county in which you reside. Fill out the application completely and accurately. Staff will assist you if you need help filling out the application.

Attend a face-to-face meeting with a caseworker at the Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services office as scheduled. If traveling to the office for a face-to-face meeting creates a hardship for you, let the caseworker know and ask if she can make other arrangements for you.

Take the necessary documentation with your to your face-to-face meeting with a caseworker, including photo identification such as a driver’s license, proof of your address such as a utility bill, something that shows everyone who lives in your house like a copy of your lease or a simple written statement, paycheck stubs or other proof of your income for the past 60 days and proof of childcare expenses and any child support that you pay. If you don’t have some of these things, go to the meeting anyway. The caseworker will help you get the documentation you need.