How to Become an Emancipated Minor in Ohio

How to Become an Emancipated Minor in Ohio
Image Credit: AnnaStills/iStock/GettyImages

The law recognizes individuals as adults at age 18, though for a variety of reasons, some teenagers want or need those rights sooner. To become an emancipated minor in Ohio, you need to understand the practical applications of Ohio emancipation laws. This understanding will require knowing how the emancipation of minors works in Ohio, along with ways to become emancipated and answers to frequently asked questions.

Advertisement

Get Your Parents to Agree

Can you get emancipated without parental consent? In Ohio, your chances of obtaining emancipation without your parents' consent are slim to none. No matter which path you take to emancipation, you will need your parents' consent at some stage. According to the experts at the Ohio State Bar Association and the Ohio revised code, emancipation will require that your parents petition the court to recognize you as emancipated outside of the extenuating circumstances. This court petition is most common in cases of custody and child support.

Advertisement

Video of the Day

The burden of proof lies with your parents, who must show that you can support yourself. Keep in mind that even if the petition is accepted, your parents may still be held responsible for some aspects of your well-being even if they aren't financially responsible for you anymore. An important note is that Ohio courts don't allow children to petition the court for emancipation. Even in abuse and neglect cases, most Ohio teens become wards of the state rather than emancipated minors. However, children may pursue legal charges or civil suits against their parents.

Advertisement

Consider also:How to Rent an Apartment at 17

Ways to Get Emancipated

If you're wondering, "Can you get emancipated without a job," the answer is yes, but it's still tricky and requires jumping through some hopes. Getting married is one of the only ways to do so. Even if your parents agree, they'll have difficulty showing the court that you can support yourself if you aren't employed.

Advertisement

This means that the most common alternative path to emancipation is to get married. The state assumes your spouse will take responsibility for your financial needs. However, that doesn't necessarily free your parents from other obligations. For example, if you stop attending high school without enrolling in an alternative program, your parents may still be held liable. You would also need their permission to drop out.

Advertisement

Many Americans don't realize that you can join the military at age 17, which can be another path to emancipation. However, the military requires a high school diploma or GED for enlistment in almost all cases. On top of that requirement, you will also need your parent's permission. As it is almost impossible to get emancipated in Ohio without parental consent, even if you join the military or get married, your parents will need to sign off.

Advertisement

Consider also:Can a Minor Legally Purchase a Car?

Specifics About Ohio Emancipation Laws

Emancipated minor rights are on a case-by-case basis; they depend on the conditions of your emancipation. Financial and legal emancipation are different; while your parents may no longer be financially responsible for you, they may maintain some legal obligations for your well-being. It's also worth noting that, unlike most other states, having a baby is not a path toward emancipation. Emancipated minor pregnancy is not recognized.

Advertisement

The emancipation age by state also varies; laws governing the emancipation of minors are different regarding this detail. Most states prohibit minor emancipation before age 16, but in some states, such as New York, people are not fully emancipated until age 21. The legal experts at the Cornell Legal Information Institute provide an excellent resource for learning about emancipation laws by state.

Advertisement

One of the best ways to achieve emancipation is to find another case very similar to yours in which the courts granted the petitioners' request. For this reason, you might want to find examples of emancipated minors to strengthen your case. Speak with a lawyer or research cases in your state for more information.

Consider also:At What Age Are You Responsible for Your Health Insurance?

Advertisement

references