Family-Sized Income Requirements for Food Stamps in Oklahoma

Oklahoma residents experiencing financial hardship may qualify for food stamps, according to the Oklahoma Department of Human Services. Single people or families applying for food stamps must meet federally-mandated income guidelines and also provide proof of U.S. citizenship. An Oklahoma resident interested in securing food stamps also must participate in an interview with a social worker regarding the reasons he needs this type of aid. Income requirements for the disabled or people over age 60 are a little more lenient than those applicable to younger, able-bodied Oklahoma residents.

Single-Member Households

As of 2010, a single person who is disabled or over 60 and wants to receive food stamps cannot bring home any more than $903 each month, according to the Oklahoma Department of Human Services. The income guidelines for elderly or disabled people is a "net" figure; this figure incorporates earnings after taxes, and qualifying expenses such as medical bills are deducted.

On the other hand, a single person who is not over 60 or disabled must meet the gross or pretax income standard. As of 2010, a single person living in Oklahoma who earns more than $1,174 monthly is ineligible to receive food stamps.

All single Oklahoma residents deemed eligible for food stamps can receive no more than $200 a month through this type of aid; some people may receive less than the maximum allotment depending upon income.

Two-Person Households

A household with two senior citizens or disabled members cannot earn more than $1,215 net per month if they wish to receive food stamps, according to the Oklahoma Department of Human Services. Other two-member households must not earn more than $1,579 gross per month. A two-person Oklahoma household can receive, as of 2010, up to $367 a month combined in food stamps.

Larger Family Sizes

A three-person household with over 60 or disabled members cannot bring in more than $1,526 net each month, according to the Oklahoma Department of Human Services; a four-member residence with over 60 or disabled people can earn up to $1,838 net each month and still qualify for food stamps.

If three people who are not disabled or over 60 live as a family and want to apply for food stamps, they cannot earn more than $1,984 monthly before taxes; a four-member household can bring in up to $2,389 gross each month.

Three-member families can qualify for up to $526 total each month in food stamps, while four-member households can potentially receive as much as $668 in food coupons each month. Larger households usually need to refer to a federal formula to determine how much they can earn in total each month and how much in food stamps they might qualify to receive. As of 2010, an eight-person, nondisabled or under 60 household could earn up to $4,010 gross per month and receive as much as $1,202 in food stamps.

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