How to Find Out When Things Are Going to Go on Sale

It's fairly easy to find out when things are going to go on sale, but it takes persistence, creativity and a little know-how. Paying full price is rarely necessary, and with these insider tips you'll be sure to save a lot of money. Knowing when things go on sale not only keeps money in your wallet, it affords you the finer things without breaking the bank and gives you opportunities you might not find otherwise.

Step 1

Get familiar with your favorite stores' sales cycle. Many products have sales regularly, and your store likely rotates the sales cycle the same each month. If you enjoy a certain food brand, watch your store and its weekly fliers for sales. Do the same the following month and track the cycle. When your items go on sale, buy a few so you have enough to last until the next sale.

Step 2

Make friends with the store manager. Getting cozy with people in the know can get you things to which you might not normally have access. This includes tips on when things will go on sale. Getting to know the produce manager, meat manager, apparel manager, any manger at any retail outlet you frequent, will help you maximize your dollar and better the odds you won't pay full price for items you love.

Step 3

Use the Internet. There are many websites dedicated to informing consumers of when sales will happen. You'll need to register on most of the sites, which is typically free, and then wait for the sale information to flood your inbox. Or you can simply check back on the website and watch the prices drop (see Resources).

Step 4

Follow the holidays. Without fail, the day after major holidays is the day of bargains.

Step 5

Sign up for the your favorite stores' newsletter or agree to receive special offers and notices. These will often alert you to "secret" sales, sales for preferred customers and upcoming specials.

Tip

Set up a bargains folder in your "Favorites." Keep all sales related sites in the same spot for easy access and comparison.

Warning

You shouldn't have to pay for "insider information."

references & resources