Analysis of "Cast Down Your Bucket"

In 1895, Booker T. Washington gave a speech to the white audience at the Cotton States and International Exposition in Atlanta (See Reference 1). The speech would be know as "The Atlanta Compromise." Washington's address became famous for his use of the "cast down your bucket" metaphor he applied to Blacks in the American South. By casting down their buckets--remaining in the South and working hard to improve their circumstance without upsetting white society--the Black community could improve their circumstances independently. This speech exemplifies Washington's beliefs in the abilities of Blacks and his willingness to appease whites. Washington's contemporary, W.E.B. Dubois, believed in demanding civil rights from government, despite the discomfort that might arise as a result. DuBois criticised "The Atlanta Compromise" for appeasement approach to white society and civil rights.

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