How to Obtain a Credit Privacy Number

How to Obtain a Credit Privacy Number
How to Obtain a Credit Privacy Number | IPGGutenbergUKLtd/iStock/GettyImages

Credit Privacy Numbers (CPN) are nine-digit numbers that act as a social security number. Essentially, these numbers protect the borrowing and personal history of the personal holding the CPN. Obtaining a CPN is free of charge, but proper steps must be taken to avoid serious consequences.

How to Obtain a Credit Privacy Number

Determine your need for a CPN. These numbers are highly controversial because the provision in a congressional law that legalizes the numbers is sometimes seen as a 'loophole.' Most use CPNs for protection and privacy, not for new credit files. Research the topic and determine if you'd be a good fit for the number.

Contact an attorney. Do not buy a CPN in the internet. There are various scams floating around that claim to offer risk-free, high potential CPNs (ones that would qualify you for an exorbitant credit line). These must be avoided so as to not lost money and potentially put yourself at the mercy of the law.

Instruct your attorney to file a request with the federal government's social security office. This will be a slow, bureaucratic process so prepare for a long wait. Before you file, you'll need to provide all your personal information, sign a waiver that bonds responsibility on the new CPN to you specifically, and provide a reason for filing for a CPN.

Wait. This process takes some time, and be prepared to answer follow-up, probing questions from the Federal Government regarding your intentions.

Use the CPN only when necessary. It is not advisable to use this number to apply for new lines of credit, but if you do so, remember that you are responsible for all and any debts incurred under both your Social Security Number and your CPN.