How to Make Debt Collectors Go Away Without Paying Them Anything

Debt collectors purchase old debts from creditors and earn all of their money by getting borrowers to pay up. Therefore, they are very persistent and often call you multiple times per week to try to get you to make payments on an old debt. If you are tired of hearing from them, invoke your rights to have them stop contacting you, all without paying a dime. The Fair Debt Collection Practices Act protects you from harassment by debt collectors, and as soon as you claim your rights, the debt collectors must stop calling and sending letters.

Step 1

Find the name and address of each collection agency calling you. You can either get this from the letter the agency first sent when trying to collect on the debt, or by asking the person you speak with on the phone.

Step 2

Type a cease and desist letter. Include your name, address and the date at the top of the letter. In the body, write a short paragraph demanding that the debt collector stop contacting you in any way about this debt. Mention the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act somewhere in the letter. State that you know your rights and will take legal action if the collector contacts you after receiving your letter.

Step 3

Print out one copy of the letter for each collection agency that is contacting you.

Step 4

Mail a letter to each agency by certified mail. This way you will be able to prove that the company received the letter in case you have to pursue legal action.

Tip

Sending a letter gets the debt collector to go away, but it does not wipe out the debt. It will still appear on your credit report after you send the letter.

If you would like to get the debt off your credit report, you will need to negotiate a payment with the debt collector. Get the terms of the payment, including removal of the account from your credit report, in writing before sending a check.

Warning

A cease and desist letter does not wipe out the debt. You still owe it, and the debt collector is allowed to take legal action against you, including suing you in an attempt to gain payment. In fact, a cease and desist letter might provoke a collector to take legal action because that is the only remaining way to collect the debt.

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