Monthly Income Limit for Michigan Medicaid

Monthly Federal Poverty Levels

The MDCH uses federal poverty levels as a basis for monthly income limits when determining an applicant’s Medicaid eligibility. The current monthly income limits for Medicaid in Michigan is 185 percent of the federal poverty level for pregnant women and families with newborns up to age one. For children ages one to 19, the income limit is 150 percent of the federal poverty level. Federal poverty levels are subject to change.

185 Percent Federal Poverty Level Limits

An applicant’s monthly income cannot exceed 185 percent of the current monthly federal poverty levels for newborns up to age one (11 months old). At the current federal poverty levels according to family size, 185 percent is: two family members-$2,267.79; three members-$2,856.71; four members-$3,445.63; five members-$4,034.54; six members-$4,623.46; seven members-$5,212.38: eight members-$5,801.29. Applicants may add $3,820 to their corresponding federal poverty guideline amount for each additional family member over eight people.

150 Percent Federal Poverty Level Limits

An applicant’s monthly income cannot exceed 150 percent of the current monthly federal poverty levels for children ages one to 19. At the current federal poverty levels according to family size, 150 percent is: two family members-$1,838.75; three members-$2,316.25; four members-$2,793.75; five members-$3,271.25; six members-$3,748.75; seven members-$4,226.25; eight members-$ 4,703.75. Applicants may add $3,820 to their corresponding federal poverty guideline amount for each additional family member over eight people.

Other Income Limits

The income limits for parents and caregivers who are taking care of children up to age 18 and seeking Medicaid coverage for themselves is 64 percent of the federal poverty limit. Individuals without children qualify for Medicaid in Michigan if their income does not exceed 45 percent of the federal poverty level. The elderly, blind and disabled qualify for Medicaid coverage if their income is not more than 100 percent of the federal poverty level, and their assets are not more than $2,000 for an individual and $3,000 for a couple.