How to Report a K-1 Statement on a 1040 Form

Reporting a K-1 Statement on a 1040 Form.

Sharing ownership in a business or other commercial concern can be an active or passive affair. A partner can be heavily involved in day-to-day operations, occasionally active in business functions, or otherwise serve as an inactive investor.

Advertisement

In any case, the investor is entitled to a share of the profits. How big a cut is determined by the size of the partner's stake and the terms of the partnership agreement. Whether a large percentage or a small portion, this allocation must be reported as income to the IRS. Preparing an accurate return requires an IRS K-1 statement .

Advertisement

Video of the Day

Schedule K-1 in Brief

What is a K-1 statement? Investors in general or limited partnerships, S-corporations, limited liability companies, and even some exchange-traded funds (ETFs) receive a Schedule K-1. Essentially, any business where the tax liability is borne by individual shareholders will send out K-1 statements to its owners. This document conveys the dividends, losses and earnings to each partner for the prior fiscal year.

Advertisement

A partnership business files Form 1065 with the IRS as an information source to which examiners may refer when studying each partner's return. The amount of capital that a single partner contributes determines the size of their profit and, thus, their taxable income. Schedule K-1 of Form 1065 reports the breakdown of the profits and losses for a partner.

Advertisement

How the K-1 Is Calculated

Each partner in a business has a basis, a stake in that enterprise. The basis is augmented when the individual draws capital into the business and it is diminished when losses occur or the partner removes money. The firm looks at basis when allocating gains, losses and dividends to each partner or beneficiary.

Advertisement

The IRS does likewise when ascertaining the correct amounts upon which to levy tax. Outside basis is the IRS term for what each individual brings to the partnership, while inside basis is what the partnership holds collectively. An owner's capital contributions, combined with liabilities incurred, equals the outside basis after adjustments are made, depending on circumstances.

Advertisement

From the K-1 to the 1040

Schedule K-1 (Form 1065) includes basic information about the partnership (Part I) and more specific data on the individual partner (Part II). This is the operative information for the IRS because Part II outlines his or her ownership interest in terms of percentages: profits, losses, capital and liabilities.

Advertisement

Revenue numbers begin in Box 1 with ordinary business income (or losses). This figure is derived from ​line 22​ of Form 1065. Other income/loss sources – like dividends, capital gains, rents, other taxes and royalties – are subsequently entered in the remainder of Part III.

Pertinent K-1 inputs are transferred to Part II of Schedule E of the Form 1040. Since 2018, the 1040 was revised with six schedules: Schedule E reflects income and losses from partnerships and other pass-through business entities.

Advertisement

Line 41​ of Schedule E is recorded on ​line 5​ of the 1040 Schedule 1. In combination with the other incomes received during the year, the total amount of additional income is entered on ​line 10​ of Schedule 1 and then ​line 8​ of the 1040 return.

Even the simplest partnerships face complex tax codes. Fortunately, there is no shortage of information.

Advertisement

references